New York Natural Heritage Program
Dwarf Hawthorn
Crataegus uniflora Muenchh.
Dicots

Habitat [-]
The only known, current record of Dwarf Hawthorn in New York is from a sandy opening in a Staten Island coastal forest. (New York Natural Heritage Program 2010). Open woods and dry slopes (Rhoads and Block 2000). Usually in sandy or rocky ground (Gleason and Cronquist 1991). Sandy or rocky banks and woods (Fernald 1970).

Associated Ecological Communities [-]
  • Coastal oak-beech forest
    A hardwood forest with oaks and American beech codominant that occurs in dry well-drained, loamy sand of morainal coves of the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Some occurrences are associated with maritime beech forest.
  • Coastal oak-heath forest*
    A low diversity, large patch to matrix, hardwood forest that typically occurs on dry, well-drained, sandy soils of glacial outwash plains or moraines of the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The forest is usually codominated by two or more species of scarlet oak, white oak, and black oak.

    * probable association but not confirmed
  • Coastal oak-hickory forest*
    A hardwood forest with oaks and hickories codominant that occurs in dry, well-drained, loamy sand of knolls, upper slopes, or south-facing slopes of glacial moraines of the Atlantic Coastal Plain.

    * probable association but not confirmed
  • Coastal oak-holly forest*
    A semi-deciduous to mixed deciduous-evergreen broadleaf forest that occurs on somewhat moist and moderately well drained silt and sandy loams in low areas on morainal plateaus. In New York State this forest is best developed on the narrow peninsulas of eastern Long Island. The trees are usually not stunted, and are removed from the pruning effects of severe salt spray. The dominant canopy trees are black oak, black gum, red maple, and American beech. American holly is abundant in the subcanopy and tall shrub layers.

    * probable association but not confirmed
  • Coastal oak-laurel forest*
    A large patch low diversity hardwood forest with broadleaf canopy and evergreen subcanopy that typically occurs on dry, well-drained, sandy and gravelly soils of morainal hills of the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The dominant tree is typically scarlet oak. The shrub layer is well-developed typically with a tall, often nearly continuous cover of the evergreen heath, mountain laurel.

    * probable association but not confirmed

Associated Species [-]
  • Red Maple (Acer rubrum)
  • Fringed Boneset (Eupatorium hyssopifolium var. laciniatum)
  • Sweet Gum (Liquidambar styraciflua)
  • Blackgum (Nyssa sylvatica)
  • Virginia Pine (Pinus virginiana)
  • Pin Oak (Quercus palustris)
  • Red Oak (Quercus rubra)
  • Post Oak (Quercus stellata)
  • Black Oak (Quercus velutina)
  • Virginia Meadow-beauty (Rhexia virginica)
  • Roundleaf Greenbrier (Smilax rotundifolia)
  • Showy Goldenrod (Solidago speciosa)
  • Highbush Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum)