New York Natural Heritage Program
Golden Corydalis
Corydalis aurea Willd.
Dicots

Habitat [-]
In New York golden corydalis is known primarily from dry, rocky calcareous sites, including alvar and limestone pavements, barrens, summits, and woodlands (New York Natural heritage program 2007). In other states it also occurs on gravelly shores, rock ledges and summits, piney woodlands, and disturbed sites such as clearings, trails, and gravel or sand pits (Voss 1985, Rhoads and Block 2000).

Associated Ecological Communities [-]
  • Alvar grassland
    A community that occurs on shallow soils over level outcrops of calcareous bedrock (limestone or dolomite). Apparently alvar grasslands are restricted to areas that are seasonally flooded in spring or after heavy rainfall, as well as seasonally dry by late summer.
  • Alvar shrubland*
    A shrub-dominated community that has over 25% cover of tall, short, and dwarf shrubs. There are often deep crevices or grikes in the limestone pavement; trees and shrubs are often rooted in the grikes.

    * probable association but not confirmed
  • Alvar woodland
    A subset of the limestone woodland community restricted to the alvar region in Jefferson County, New York.
  • Calcareous cliff community*
    A community that occurs on vertical exposures of resistant, calcareous bedrock (such as limestone or dolomite) or consolidated material; these cliffs often include ledges and small areas of talus.

    * probable association but not confirmed
  • Calcareous pavement barrens
    A savanna community that occurs on nearly level outcrops of calcareous bedrock (limestone or dolomite). The community consists of a mosaic of shrub-savanna, grass-savanna, and rock outcrop vegetation.
  • Calcareous red cedar barrens*
    A small-patch calcareous rocky summit community occurring on dry, south-facing to southwest-facing slopes and low summits. These sites are characterized by stunted, sparse woodlands with small grassland openings.

    * probable association but not confirmed
  • Calcareous shoreline outcrop
    A community that occurs along the shores of lakes and streams on outcrops of calcareous rocks such as limestone and dolomite. The vegetation is sparse; most plants are rooted in rock crevices.
  • Calcareous talus slope woodland*
    An open or closed canopy community that occurs on talus slopes composed of calcareous bedrock such as limestone or dolomite. The soils are usually moist and loamy; there may be numerous rock outcrops.

    * probable association but not confirmed
  • Cliff community*
    A community that occurs on vertical exposures of resistant, non-calcareous bedrock (such as quartzite, sandstone, or schist) or consolidated material; these cliffs often include ledges and small areas of talus.

    * probable association but not confirmed
  • Dwarf pine ridges*
    A woodland community dominated by dwarf individuals of pitch pine and black huckleberry, which occurs on flat-topped summits of rocky ridges. The bedrock is a white quartzite conglomerate; soils are very thin, and they are rich in organic matter from litter that has accumulated on the bedrock.

    * probable association but not confirmed
  • Limestone woodland
    A woodland that occurs on shallow soils over limestone bedrock in non-alvar settings, and usually includes numerous rock outcrops. There are usually several codominant trees, although one species may become dominant in any one stand.
  • Northern white cedar rocky summit*
    A community that occurs on cool, dry, rocky ridgetops and summits where the bedrock is calcareous (such as limestone or dolomite), and the soils are more or less calcareous. The vegetation may be sparse or patchy, with numerous rock outcrops. The species have predominantly boreal distributions.

    * probable association but not confirmed
  • Pitch pine-oak-heath rocky summit*
    A community that occurs on warm, dry, rocky ridgetops and summits where the bedrock is non-calcareous (such as quartzite, sandstone, or schist), and the soils are more or less acidic. This community is broadly defined and includes examples that may lack pines and are dominated by scrub oak and/or heath shrubs apparently related to fire regime.

    * probable association but not confirmed
  • Red cedar rocky summit*
    A community that occurs on warm, dry, rocky ridgetops and summits where the bedrock is calcareous (such as limestone or dolomite, but also marble, amphibolite, and calcsilicate rock), and the soils are more or less calcareous. The vegetation may be sparse or patchy, with numerous lichen covered rock outcrops.

    * probable association but not confirmed
  • Shale cliff and talus community*
    A community that occurs on nearly vertical exposures of shale bedrock and includes ledges and small areas of talus. Talus areas are composed of small fragments that are unstable and steeply sloping; the unstable nature of the shale results in uneven slopes and many rock crevices.

    * probable association but not confirmed
  • Successional red cedar woodland*
    A woodland community that commonly occurs on abandoned agricultural fields and pastures, usually at elevations less than 1000 ft (305 m). The dominant tree is eastern red cedar, which may occur widely spaced in young stands and may be rather dense in more mature stands.

    * probable association but not confirmed

Associated Species [-]
  • Northern Maidenhair-fern (Adiantum pedatum)
  • Climbing Fumitory (Adlumia fungosa)
  • American Harebell (Campanula rotundifolia)
  • Back's Sedge (Carex backii)
  • Short-scale Sedge (Carex deweyana)
  • Bristleleaf Sedge (Carex eburnea)
  • Rosy Sedge (Carex rosea)
  • Northern Wild Comfrey (Cynoglossum virginianum)
  • Marginal Wood Fern (Dryopteris marginalis)
  • Virginia Strawberry (Fragaria virginiana)
  • Bicknell's Cranesbill (Geranium bicknellii)
  • Red Cedar (Juniperus virginiana)
  • Hophornbeam (Ostrya virginiana)
  • Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus)
  • Canada Bluegrass (Poa compressa)
  • Red Oak (Quercus rubra)
  • Virginia Saxifrage (Saxifraga virginiensis)
  • Northern White Cedar (Thuja occidentalis)
  • White Basswood (Tilia americana)
  • Eastern Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron radicans)