New York Natural Heritage Program
Broom Crowberry
Corema conradii (Torr.) Torr. ex Loud.
Dicots
Corema conradii Troy Weldy
Family: Crowberry Family (Empetraceae)

State Protection: Endangered
listed species are those with: 1) 5 or fewer extant sites, or 2) fewer than 1,000 individuals, or 3) restricted to fewer than 4 U.S.G.S. 7 minute topographical maps, or 4) species listed as endangered by U.S. Department of Interior.

Federal Protection: Not Listed

State Rarity Rank: S1
A State Rarity Rank of S1 means: This plant is endangered/critically imperiled in New York because of extreme rarity (typically 5 or fewer populations or very few remaining individuals) or is extremely vulnerable to extirpation from New York due to biological factors.

Global Rarity Rank: G4
A Global Rarity Rank of G4 means: This species is apparently secure globally (typically with more than 100+ populations), though it may be quite rare in parts of its range, especially at the periphery.


Did you know?
The New York plants on Ulster County's Shawangunk Ridge represent the only non-coastal site in the world where this plant grows naturally. The discovery of this population in 1881 created an exciting stir within the botanical community. Some traveled hundreds of miles to see this non-coastal population. Even today, this Corema population attracts many interested botanists and naturalists every year.

State Ranking Justification [-]
There are only two known populations that are present on the same ridgeline in the Shawangunks. This may later be merged into a single meta-population with two sub-populations. These plants have been closely monitored since 1881. There is an historical report from Long Island, but numerous searches for it have proved unsuccessful. Besides possible reductions due to deer browse and trampling, the known populations are well-protected. The New York plants on Ulster County's Shawangunk Ridge represent the only non-coastal site in the world where this plant grows naturally.

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