New York Natural Heritage Program
Southern Dodder
Cuscuta obtusiflora var. glandulosa Engelm.
Dicots
Cuscuta obtusiflora var. glandulosa Stephen M. Young
Family: Dodder Family (Cuscutaceae)

State Protection: Endangered
listed species are those with: 1) 5 or fewer extant sites, or 2) fewer than 1,000 individuals, or 3) restricted to fewer than 4 U.S.G.S. 7 minute topographical maps, or 4) species listed as endangered by U.S. Department of Interior.

Federal Protection: Not Listed

State Rarity Rank: S1S2
A State Rarity Rank of S1S2 means: Critically Imperiled or Imperiled in New York - Especially or very vulnerable to disappearing from New York due to rarity or other factors; typically 20 or fewer populations or locations in New York, very few individuals, very restricted range, few remaining acres (or miles of stream), and/or steep declines. More information is needed to assign a single conservation status.

Global Rarity Rank: G5T4T5
A Global Rarity Rank of G5T4T5 means: Apparently or Demonstrably Secure globally - The subspecies/variety is uncommon to common in the world, but not rare; usually widespread, but may be rare in some parts of its range; possibly some cause for long-term concern due to declines or other factors. More information is needed to assign a single conservation status. (The species as a whole is common globally.)


Did you know?
Southern dodder was not known in New York until 1996 when it was discovered in a red maple-sweetgum swamp on Staten Island. The common name may come from a Middle Dutch word meaning the yoke of an egg referring to the yellow color of some of the flowers of Cuscuta. Dodder is an annual but some of its connections to the host plant (haustoria) may survive the winter and start new plants already on the host in the spring. The vines always seem to wrap around the host plant in a counterclockwise direction. Dodder is a speed demon when it comes to finding a host. Germination, emergence and attachment to the host may occur in as little as 24 hours and the seedling must find a host in 5-10 days or it will die.

State Ranking Justification [-]
There are five existing populations that have been surveyed since the species was discovered in New York in 1996. Specimens need to be examined in herbaria to discover if the species was in New York before that.

Short-term Trends [-]

Long-term Trends [-]