New York Natural Heritage Program
Squashberry
Viburnum edule (Michx.) Raf.
Dicots
Family: Honeysuckle Family (Caprifoliaceae)

State Protection: Threatened
listed species are those with: 1) 6 to fewer than 20 extant sites, or 2) 1,000 to fewer than 3,000 individuals, or 3) restricted to not less than 4 or more than 7 U.S.G.S. 7 minute topographical maps, or 4) listed as threatened by U.S. Department of Interior.

Federal Protection: Not Listed

State Rarity Rank: S2
A State Rarity Rank of S2 means: This plant is threatened/imperiled in New York because of rarity (typically 6-20 populations or few remaining individuals) or is vulnerable to extirpation from New York due to biological factors.

Global Rarity Rank: G5
A Global Rarity Rank of G5 means: This species is demonstrably secure globally, though it may be quite rare in parts of its range, especially at the periphery.


Did you know?
Squashberry may be more common than we think because it occurs along small streams in the Adirondacks and most of these are fairly inaccessible. Pioneers in Newfoundland swallowed the juice of the berries in the belief that it cured colds (Squashberry in The Dark Tickle Company, web site accessed 21 November 2007). The berry is indeed easy to squash.

State Ranking Justification [-]
There are 14 existing populations but all of them have fewer than 50 plants each. There are three additional historical records, and more populations may be found as more remote streams are surveyed. Numbers may decrease in the future if plants are attacked by the viburnum leaf beetle.

Short-term Trends [-]

Long-term Trends [-]