New York Natural Heritage Program
Peregrine Falcon
Falco peregrinus Tunstall, 1771
Birds
Peregrine Falcon Jesse W. Jaycox
Family: Caracaras and Falcons (Falconidae)

State Protection: Endangered
A native species in imminent danger of extirpation or extinction in New York (includes any species listed as federally Endangered by the United States). It is illegal to take, import, transport, possess, or sell an animal listed as Endangered, or its parts, without a permit from NYSDEC. 1) Any native species in imminent danger of extirpation or extinction in New York. 2) Any species listed as endangered by the United States Department of the Interior.

Federal Protection: Migratory Bird Treaty Act
The Migratory Bird Treaty Act implements various treaties and conventions between the U. S. and Canada, Japan, Mexico and the former Soviet Union for the protection of migratory birds. Under this Act, taking, killing, or possessing migratory birds, including nests or eggs, is unlawful unless specifically permitted by other regulations.


State Rarity Rank: S3B
A State Rarity Rank of S3B means: Typically 21 to 100 breeding occurrences or limited breeding acreage in New York State.

Global Rarity Rank: G4
A Global Rarity Rank of G4 means: Apparently secure globally, though it may be quite rare in parts of its range, especially at the periphery.


Did you know?
The Peregrine Falcon is the fastest known flying bird. The highest flight speed recorded is 60 mph. They can dive from mid-air at speeds up to 200 mph to attack their prey.

State Ranking Justification [-]
During the 2006 breeding season, 62 territorial pairs were reported in the state (Loucks 2006). The population has been steadily recovering from extirpation since the first breeding pair was documented in 1983. However, many of the existing pairs, especially in urban areas and on bridges, would fail if it wasn't for intensive management (Loucks 2005). It is too soon to determine if the population is stable. Threats to nesting pairs still exist.

Short-term Trends [-]

Long-term Trends [-]