New York Natural Heritage Program
Alpine Sliding Fen
System: Palustrine
SubSystem: Open Peatlands

State Protection: Not Listed
Federal Protection: Not Listed

State Rarity Rank: S1S2
A State Rarity Rank of S1S2 means: Critically Imperiled or Imperiled in New York - Especially or very vulnerable to disappearing from New York due to rarity or other factors; typically 20 or fewer populations or locations in New York, very few individuals, very restricted range, few remaining acres (or miles of stream), and/or steep declines. More information is needed to assign a single conservation status.

Global Rarity Rank: G3G4
A Global Rarity Rank of G3G4 means: Vulnerable globally, or Apparently Secure -- At moderate risk of extinction, with relatively few populations or locations in the world, few individuals, and/or restricted range; or uncommon but not rare globally; may be rare in some parts of its range; possibly some cause for long-term concern due to declines or other factors. More information is needed to assign a single conservation status.


Did you know?
Sliding fens presumably become supersaturated from major rain events and slide off the cliff before peat build-up resumes. Water is derived from runoff and seeps at higher elevation. Reportedly the peat will accumulate until a critical mass is built up and the large areas of the peat mat slide to the bottom of the steep slope, a phenomenon that may occur once about every 500 years. Alpine sliding fens are limited to the highest elevation areas of the state above the timberline (about 3,500 feet).

State Ranking Justification [-]
There are probably less than 10 occurrences of alpine sliding fen statewide totaling less than 30 acres. Alpine sliding fens are limited to the highest elevation areas of the state above the timberline (about 3,500 feet). Alpine sliding fen vegetation is fragile and threatened by visitors trampling it. Although all occurrences are protected on state land, all are threatened by the combined effects of recreational overuse, atmospheric deposition, and possibly climate change.

Short-term Trends [-]

Long-term Trends [-]